Spicy Poetry, and Help from Readers

As an idea for a poem (inscape, imagist, and sensuous), I think writing a series of couplets or verse (triplets at the most) about Spices would be interesting.

My brothers and I were talking about spices and cooking, and i got to thinking. My first shot was to think:

tarragon – for making bearnaise and tartare
from french, le dragon herb lives ever in wine
to spice our soups, just in time.

Or something, that’s just a quick idea. (Besides, i know that tarragon is from the French for Dragon), he he!

Now for the help. I’d like to write many of these, and want everyone to leave a quick comment saying which herb you want immortalized.

Please name any, and before the spring planting time (or, for oz and you tropical folks, pretty soon), I will compose a set of verses about spices, their uses, word history, flavors, particular foods and just a few more ideas.

Please help! Comment and tell me an herb you love, a spice you sigh about, a flavoring you cannot live without!

Thanks ever so much, then!

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About dragonpoet

But sometimes what you write is neither polished nor useful. Then it arrives here. With lots of sentence fragments and beginning ideas. If you wish, please comment on what you find. If you don't like the politics, don't comment. Here, we deal with the writing.
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6 Responses to Spicy Poetry, and Help from Readers

  1. tamahome says:

    aloe~ makes me beautiful ha ^_^

  2. Clartedubois says:

    There you are wrong, dear!
    The French word for it is estragon…
    Not my favourite, though.

    One is basilic and I know for sure it means king in Greek.
    And of course there is the lavendel.
    You should see the fields in South of France…
    Heliotrop is one of my favorite scent and of course you can use in kitchen too..

  3. ineke says:

    Vietnamese hot mint.
    An ex-lover of mine was a gardener and first introduced me to the herb, thrown into his entirely home grown salad…at first I thought it tasted like dirt…but I grew to adore it…. it’s a flavour I really miss living in this country where to even find a basil plant is an achievement.

  4. Clartedubois says:

    Hi!Ineke, why didn’t you say “dragon” is the Dutch name for tarragon?
    Yet, the French sometime use the word “herbe dragon” or armoise…
    The latin is artemisia dracunculus…
    And I suggest you to try chicken with it or in reverse!
    En route pour la cuisine, brotherhood!

    Lavender and not lavandel in salads…
    With flowers: marigolds and roses and roses and cardamon…
    Cinnamon,not cinamar in tea and hot wine with cloves…
    Asperule( wood-ruff) in the maitrank…
    Give me time!
    I come with more…
    Somewhere else.

  5. Dustin says:

    this is really mundane I know. But how about good old fashioned salt. I thnik it’s really taken for granted, but I love it! reminds me of the sea

  6. Clartedubois says:

    Some new cuisine.

    Rosemay is on poppy seed,
    Mace from here, Sumac from there
    Nigella prefers Oinion and Parsley
    Clove and Bay leaves go with Lemon balm
    Mustard the smallest seed, friend of Abraham
    Sage Cayenne from the pepper adores Basil and Cumin.
    Angelica & Thyme goes & says : Sesame,ouvre-toi to Caraway.
    Vanilla is high as a kite in the sky with her friend Turmeric.
    Tarragorn the old Dragon has a weakness for( O)dill and Fenugreek!
    Licorice travels with his Horseradish to Szechwan pepper and Tamarind.
    Star Anise, Safron, Savory and Lemon grass are the friends of Galangal.

    Warning: the above blends have not been tried.
    Therefore, the writer suggests the greater caution.
    And doesn’t take the responsiblity for the indigestion.

    from Encyclopedia of spices.

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